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Thinking of becoming an Irish Citizen?

Applications for Irish Citizenship and Irish Passports have increased in recent times, most likely as a result of the Brexit Referendum and US Presidential Election in 2016. Irish Citizenship essential means European Citizenship and there is the view that having a European Passport has its advantages.

There are a number of ways that one can become an Irish Citizen:

Birth/Descent:

  • If a person was born in Ireland before January 1st 2005
  • If a child was born in Ireland after January 1st 2005 and his/her parent(s) were Irish Citizens
  • If a child was born in Ireland after January 1st 2005 and he/she has a British parent, or a parent entitled to live in Ireland (including Northern Ireland) without restriction
  • If a child was born in Ireland after January 1st 2005 and there is proof of a “genuine link” to Ireland i.e. the parent(s) were resident in Ireland (including Northern Ireland) for 3 out of 4 years before birth of the child
  • If a child was born outside Ireland and either of his/her parents were Irish Citizens born in Ireland
  • If a child was born outside Ireland and either of his/her parents were Irish Citizens at the date of the child’s birth
  • If a child has a grandparent an Irish Citizen born in Ireland
  • If a child is adopted by an Irish Citizen

If the child was not born in Ireland, prior to applying for Citizenship his/her birth must be registered in the Foreign Births Register

Naturalisation:

Persons not born but living in Ireland can become Irish Citizens in certain circumstances:

 

  • The person is 18 years or older, or
  • The person is a minor born in Ireland since 1 January 2005, and
  • The person is of good character, and
  • The person has 1 year continuous reckonable residence in Ireland and, during the 8 years preceding that, has a total of 4 years’ reckonable residence, and
  • The person intends to continue residing in the State after naturalisation, and
  • The person is self-supporting and of his/her dependants while living in Ireland.

 

The Minister for Justice and Equality can waive some of these conditions, to include if

  • The person is of Irish descent or of Irish associations
  • The person is a spouse or civil partner of an Irish citizen
  • The person has been resident abroad in the public service
  • The person is recognised as a refugee.

Applying for Naturalisation involves completing the required Application form, which is available on the INIS Website (Irish Naturalisation and Immigration Service) and submitting it to the Department of Justice and Equality with the required fee of €175.00.

For further information or assistance in making an Application for Naturalisation please contact Mary Cashin This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or Sheila Lynch This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or telephone 065 6840060.

14th February 2017

 

 

This information is intended as a guide only and does not purport to be a legal interpretation. While every care is taken to ensure a quality service, Cashin & Associates does not give any guarantees, undertakings or warranties concerning the accuracy, completeness or up-to-date nature of information provided. Users are responsible for confirming information from the full text from published sources. 

Cashin & Associates Solicitors,
3 Francis Street, Ennis, Co. Clare, Ireland
Dublin Office: 64 Francis Street, Dublin 8
T: 00 353 65 6840060  F: 00 353 65 6840034
E: info@cashinlaw.com